England’s No. 2 doctor warns of ‘hard months to come in the winter’ from COVID : NPR

The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Boris Johnson left 10 Downing Street on Wednesday, November 3, 2021 to attend the Prime Minister’s weekly question and answer session in Parliament in London.

Christy Wigglesworth / AP


Hide captions

Toggle caption.

Christy Wigglesworth / AP


The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Boris Johnson left 10 Downing Street on Wednesday, November 3, 2021 to attend the Prime Minister’s weekly question and answer session in Parliament in London.

Christy Wigglesworth / AP

LONDON – A number of people believe the epidemic is over, warning that the high coronavirus rate and rising mortality in the UK could mean that the epidemic is over, the UK’s deputy chief medical officer said on Wednesday. Winter is a difficult month. “

Jonathan Van Tom also said he was concerned that the rising death toll showed that infections were “now beginning to enter older groups.”

Van Tom told the BBC that coronavirus rates were still high. They are larger than most European countries. “We’re running very hot. And, of course, it’s a concern for scientists that we’re running this heat early in the fall.”

“I personally feel that some difficult winter months are coming and it is not over,” he added.

The British government on Wednesday reported 41,299 new COVID-19 cases and 217 deaths. The country recorded the highest number of daily deaths since February – 293 – on Tuesday.

While new cases are falling to less than 46,000 a day in October, the UK still has a higher infection rate than most European countries.

Van Tam said the decline in the number of cases mainly reflects the recent rise in youth. He warned that while the number of hospital admissions has increased and the total number of patients in hospitals has declined slightly, the overall picture is still worrisome.

“It may be a break before things go up, it may be the first sign that things are starting to stabilize but at a higher rate,” he said. “But my concern is that the death toll is rising and this shows that the infection is now beginning to enter these older groups.”

The UK is at the forefront of launching its vaccination program, and most adults have been fully vaccinated. A booster shot is being offered to millions of people, including everyone over the age of 50. But the government has been cautious about vaccinating adolescents and young people, and only this September allowed healthy 12- to 15-year-olds to be employed.

Jeremy Brown, a member of the government’s Vaccination Advisory Committee, said it was “too hasty” to follow the US lead in vaccinating children 11 and under.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative government lifted restrictions on almost all corona viruses in July, including mandatory face masks and social distance requirements. Nightclubs and crowded places were allowed to open completely and the work was terminated on the advice of the house.

Authorities have resisted calls to reintroduce restrictions, such as wearing mandatory masks, and are increasingly relying on vaccines to keep infections at bay.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *